Loading...

Pesquisar este blog

http://grupodestudoslutas.blogspot.com

Seguidores

Quem sou eu

São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
Professor da EEFE-USP; Praticante e Pesquisador de Judô; Preparador físico de atletas de modalidades esportivas de combate.

Arquivo do blog

quinta-feira, 3 de janeiro de 2013

Respostas fisiológicas ao BJJ. Artigo liderado pelo Leonardo Vidal Andreato


http://hrcak.srce.hr/file/139174

Kinesiology, Vol.44 No.2 December 2012.

Original scientific paper
PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSES AND RATE OF PERCEIVED EXERTION IN BRAZILIAN JIU-JITSU ATHLETES
Leonardo Vidal Andreato ; Exercise Physiology Laboratory, Human Physiology Department, State University of Maringá, Brazil
Solange Marta Franzói de Moraes ; Exercise Physiology Laboratory, Human Physiology Department, State University of Maringá, Brazil
João Victor Del Conti Esteves ; Exercise Physiology Laboratory, Human Physiology Department, State University of Maringá, Brazil
Raphaela Regina de Araújo Pereira ; Laboratory of Research and Development of Drug Liberations Systems, Pharmacy Department, State University of Maringá, Brazil
Tricy Lopes de Moraes Gomes ; Exercise Physiology Laboratory, Human Physiology Department, State University of Maringá, Brazil
Thaís Vidal Andreato ; Exercise Physiology Laboratory, Human Physiology Department, State University of Maringá, Brazil
Emerson Franchini ; Martial Arts and Combat Sports Research Group, Sport Department, School of Physical Education and Sport, University of São Paulo, Brazil    
Abstracts
In this study, the physiological responses and rate of perceived exertion in Brazilian jiu-jitsu fighters submitted to a combat simulation were investigated. Venous blood samples and heart rate were taken from twelve male Brazilian jiu-jitsu athletes (27.1±2.7 yrs, 75.4±8.8 kg, 174.9±4.4 cm, 9.2±2.4% fat), at rest, after a warm-up (ten minutes), immediately after the fight simulation (seven minutes) and after recovery (fourteen minutes). After the combat the rate of perceived exertion was collected. The combat of the Brazilian jiujitsu
fighters did not change blood concentrations of glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein and very low density lipoprotein, ureia and ammonia. However, blood levels of high density
lipoprotein were significantly higher post-fight (before: 43.0±6.9 mg/dL, after: 45.1±8.0 mg/dL) and stayed at high levels during the recovery period (43.6±8.1 mg/dL) compared to the rest values (40.0±6.6 mg/dL). The fight did not cause changes in the concentrations of the cell damage markers of creatine kinase, aspartate
aminotransferase and creatinine. However, blood concentrations of the alanine aminotransferase (before: 16.1±7.1 U/L, after: 18.6±7.1 U/L) and lactate dehydrogenase (before: 491.5±177.6 U/L, after: 542.6±141.4 U/L) enzymes were elevated after the fight. Heart rate (before: 122±25 bpm, after: 165±17 bpm) and lactate (before: 2.5±1.2 mmol/L, after: 11.9±5.8 mmol/L) increased significantly with the completion of combat. Despite this, the athletes rated the fight as being light or somewhat hard (12±2). These results showed that
muscle glycogen is not the only substrate used in Brazilian jiu-jitsu fights, since there are indications of activation of the glycolytic, lipolytic and proteolytic pathways. Furthermore, the athletes rated the combats
as being light or somewhat hard although muscle damage markers were generated.
Keywords
energy demands; combat sport; recovery; metabolic profile

Nenhum comentário:

Postar um comentário